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Post-election Statement to AU Students from AU Librarians

This was sent out over email before Thanksgiving, but we wanted to make sure it would reach everyone.

Dear Students,

In the wake of a campaign season that has exposed deep divisions in our country, the Alfred University Librarians reaffirm our role in serving and supporting every member of our community.

We strongly endorse the following statement issued by the American Libraries Association:

“During times like these, our nation’s 120,000 public, academic, school, and special libraries are invaluable allies inspiring understanding and community healing. Libraries provide a safe place for individuals of all ages and backgrounds and for difficult discussions on social issues. Our nation’s libraries serve all community members, including people of color, immigrants, people with disabilities, and the most vulnerable in our communities, offering services and educational resources that transform communities, open minds, and promote inclusion and diversity.

As an association representing these libraries, librarians, and library workers, the American Library Association believes that the struggle against racism, prejudice, stereotyping, and discrimination is central to our mission. As we have throughout our 140-year-long history, we will continue to support efforts to abolish intolerance and cultural invisibility, stand up for all the members of the communities we serve, and promote understanding and inclusion through our work.”

[Full statement: https://americanlibrariesmagazine.org/blogs/the-scoop/statement-libraries-association-diversity-inclusion/]

It is the goal of the libraries to support all of our patrons including those who may feel vulnerable at this time. We invite you to contact either of the libraries’ directors to let us know how we might best meet your needs.

Mark Smith, Scholes Library, msmith@alfred.edu, 607-871-2494
Steve Crandall, Herrick Library, fcrandall@alfred.edu, 607-871-2987

— The Alfred University Librarians

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AU Libraries mark Open Access week

During the week of October 24-28, the Alfred University Libraries celebrated Open Access Week with a series of SUNY-sponsored webinars. The webinars highlighted the potential of this movement to benefit libraries and researchers.

What is Open Access?
Open Access is the free, immediate, online availability of research articles, combined with the rights to use these articles fully in the digital environment. This contrasts with the dominant scholarly communication system that puts research behind publisher “pay walls” and asks authors to relinquish rights to their own writing.

Why does Open Access matter?
The current system of scholarly publishing puts large financial burdens on libraries and severely restricts access to scholarly research. Faculty contribute research articles to scholarly journals for free, signing away their copyright in the process, and libraries must then buy back this content through annual subscription fees that have grown by as much as 400% in recent years.

As illustrated in the chart below, some major scientific publishers are realizing profits that exceed the returns of successful companies like Google and Apple:

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What can you do to support the Open Access movement?
Authors can take steps to preserve their rights. To learn more, watch this very informative webinar on “Understanding and Protecting Your Rights” by Jill Cirasella of the City University of New York.

How do the AU Libraries plan to improve access to faculty and student research?
You may have heard of AURA, Alfred University’s institutional repository. AURA is designed to provide access and to ensure the long-term preservation of documents produced at Alfred University, including faculty and student research.

The Open Access movement is an important piece of the puzzle, because many publishers place restrictions on what faculty can do with their own work, making it more difficult for libraries to archive copies locally.

The more faculty and students learn about their own rights, and take concrete steps to retain those rights, the easier it will be for libraries like ours to ensure long-term access to the intellectual output of our campus.

-Ellen Bahr, Information Systems Librarian, Herrick Library

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Get a Clue at AU

Was it Colonel Mustard in the library with the lead pipe? Possibly! It was certainly in the library, at any rate.

The AU Libraries are getting into the Halloween spirit this year with a Clue-themed library scavenger hunt. The six Clue “weapons” will be hidden in the two campus libraries, and everyone who finds all six wins some tasty prizes, and the chance to win even bigger.

How it works:

  • Download the clue sheet online or collect it at either library
  • Alone or with a group, use the clue sheet to find all six clues in the libraries–feel free to ask librarians or library staff for help!
  • Each time you find a clue, take one of the “weapon” slips from the envelope
  • When you’ve collected all six, take a selfie of yourself(ves) with all six “weapons” slips and post it to our Facebook or Instagram pages
  • Show the FB/Instagram post at the front desk of either library to collect your prize and be entered in the drawing for one of 3 $25 gift cards
  • PROFIT

How to share your selfies with us:

Clue Sheet:
cluesandinstructions

The clue sheet can also be downloaded here: https://www.dropbox.com/s/s0glgwa0d1e7qi6/GetaClueCluesandInstructions.pdf?dl=0

The scavenger hunt will be running from November 7th-18th, but drop by the libraries on Halloween to meet some of the characters and learn more about it! You can also get all the latest updates by following us on our social media:

Scholes Library Facebook   Herrick Library Facebook   AU Libraries Instagram   AU Libraries Twitter

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Check Out Our New Study Rooms at the Herrick Library!

Looking for a quiet space to study or meet in? Whether you are looking for an area for independent study or to meet with others, Herrick offers several options!

If you are interested in reserving a room for a particular date and time, there are four rooms to choose from: The Seminar Room (106), The Conference Room (202), the Children’s Room (212), and the Computer Lab (120).

The Seminar Room is an excellent option for group meetings. Along with four rectangular tables and eight chairs (with more chairs available if needed), it comes equipped with a ceiling mounted projector and screen, laptop, LCD television, and podium with a built-in sound system. A conference phone is also available for set-up upon request. You will find the Seminar Room on the first floor near the Learning Commons; it is the last room on the left:seminar room.jpg

The Conference Room is also an excellent option for group meetings. One large conference table and 12 chairs sit in the center of the room. It is best for groups who do not require a projector on a regular basis or AV capabilities. Herrick’s “Harry Potter” room, as many of our students refer to it, holds a historic charm that makes it an appealing space to meet either in groups or individually. It is located on the second floor at the top of the stairs leading from near the main entrance and to the right:confrence-room

The Computer Lab, opposite the front desk on the first floor, is available for student use at all times during library hours. It is also ideal for class or club meetings which require computer and internet access. The lab includes 16 computers and chairs (extra chairs may be brought in from other areas of the library for larger groups). It is also equipped with an LCD projector, moveable podium, desktop computer with sound system, and an erasable whiteboard. Additional laptops, dry-erase markers, and a remote control for the LCD projector may be checked out at the front desk:computer-lab

The Children’s Room is perfect for individual and group study sessions, as well as for smaller club meetings. Located on the second floor directly in front of the stairs leading from near the main entrance to the library, the room contains one table and eight standard chairs, two armchairs, and one rocking chair. It also includes one desktop computer for personal research and browsing:childrens-room

In addition to the four rooms above, the BookEnd Lounge is also available for reservation upon request. This area is large, open, and welcoming, making it accommodating for faculty, staff, and student campus events. In the past, the lounge has hosted events such as Team Trivia Night, Massage and Therapy Dog Night, short-term art exhibits and auctions, orientations, ceremonies, and receptions. The BookEnd Lounge also has a café area that may be used to lay out food and beverages for guests.bookend-lounge

To make a reservation, please visit the following link to check for room availability and to make a room reservation request: http://herrick.alfred.edu/index.php/reservation-request-form

If you are a walk-in, you are welcome to use the Seminar Room, Conference Room, Children’s Room, Computer Lab, and BookEnd Lounge for personal use as long as they have not already been reserved for that time. J

There are also other options for walk-ins! Herrick has recently constructed four new study rooms that are available on a first come, first serve basis.

Two of the study rooms, Room 20 and Room 21, are located opposite the elevator on the ground floor of the library:

One study room, Room 122, is located first floor near the side entrance of the library :room 122.jpg

Last but not least, there is another study room near the ground floor entrance to the library near the parking lot. This study room is also known as Room 25:room-25

Please feel free to stop by Herrick to check out all of our rooms in person!

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Exhibit Opening and Reception: Medieval Manuscripts of Alfredum

You’re all invited! Come enjoy light refreshments in the Scholes Library this Thursday, October 20th, from 11:20 am to 12:00 pm, while admiring illuminated manuscript pages created by our students, alongside beautiful manuscript reproductions from Special Collections. I had the opportunity to work with the students and help them discover some of the manuscript facsimiles we have here at Scholes, and it was very exciting to see the work they turned in afterwards. (And did I mention refreshments?)

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